Review Of Eleanor & Park

Thursday, 31 July 2014
Book: Eleanor & Park
Author: Rainbow Rowell
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
Genre: Young Adult, Contemporary, Romance, Adorable Books
Cover:











Rating: 3/5 Stars

Summary: Two misfits.
One extraordinary love.

Eleanor
... Red hair, wrong clothes. Standing behind him until he turns his head. Lying beside him until he wakes up. Making everyone else seem drabber and flatter and never good enough...Eleanor.

Park... He knows she'll love a song before he plays it for her. He laughs at her jokes before she ever gets to the punch line. There's a place on his chest, just below his throat, that makes her want to keep promises...Park.

Set over the course of one school year, this is the story of two star-crossed sixteen-year-olds—smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try.

*WARNING! UNPOPULAR OPINION! YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!*

Review: I first mistake was reading this book right after The Fault in Our Stars by John Green. My second mistake was going into this book with such high expectations. Lesson learned: I shouldn't expect to love all contemporaries as much as I loved TFiOS (The Fault in Our Stars). That's basically why I don't usually read two contemporaries in a row.

Anyway, I found this book to be a bit too slow for my tastes and while I get that real life usually isn't rushed and that it takes time to develop a relationship, I just felt that it dragged on for too long. That's not to say that I didn't like the writing. The writing, for me at least, was the best part.

I also didn't really connect to the characters that much. They were too awkward and different for my tastes (more Eleanor than Park). It felt as if she was the awkward teenager taken to the extreme. Not only did she have imperfect hair, but she also wore weird clothes, and her stepfather was awful to her, and her real father didn't really care about her that much, and she had no phone in her house, and she also didn't have batteries, and she was bulled, and she was larger than the average girl, and...well you get my point. It got to the point where I stopped feeling bad for her. 99.9% of the time, females have something that they like about themselves/something that they like in their life. For example, I like my blog posts. I like how honest I am and my occasional rambles about how gorgeous a fictional boy is. (I'm looking at you Maxon Schreave and also at you Chaol Westfall, and Dorian Havilliard, and at hundreds of other boys *cough* Augustus Waters *cough* because fictional boys are (99.99% of the time) better than the real thing.)

I get that Park is the something that she likes but she's fictional. Her world should include something else that she likes that is not a boy. (For those of you thinking about her family and friends, I wish she'd liked something about herself and if she did, it should have been more prominent and not drowned in negativity.)

I liked how unconventional the pairing was. It was a nice change for the usual pairings. Don't get me wrong, the usual pairings in books are awesome, but a little variety is always nice.

Overall, it's not my favourite book in the world, but I can see why some of you love it. However, I am excited to give Fangirl a try. (Cath and I will probably have a lot in common considering how big of a fangirl I am.)

- Hearts And Crowns

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